Thursday, December 21, 2006

The Kelo Curse

Well, I can't say as I blame the poor woman. Susette Kelo has literally been kicked out of her home for private development's gain, so she decided to send city officials and members of New London's development agency, a little holiday message. OK, so it wasn't in the spirit of Christmas, but seeing as she was forced against her will to accept a settlement, I can see why she would be bitter.

I took this photo at the State Capitol in Hartford in May 2006, at a rally in support of the New London residents. I had the pleasure of meeting Susette Kelo as well as Michael Christofaro. Both are very nice people who were thrust into the national spotlight by being tossed out of their homes for the gain of private development. The misery and aggravation (and legal costs) that they had to endure is not something anyone should have to live through.

Those municipal leaders and developers just don't get it that sometimes the money doesn't matter, sometimes it's the principle of the thing, and sometimes it's about one's Constitutional right to their property. People are still reeling from the Supreme Court's decision to allow the taking of private property in order to give it to private developers so they can make money on this real estate deal thinly disguised as a "public benefit". Susette Kelo may have settled for more than $400,000, but I will wager that those developers will reap many many millions more from that prime piece of real estate.

Here is the text of the holiday card (which showed a lovely picture of her home on the front) that Susette Kelo sent to members of the New London Development Corp., city officials, and others involved in taking her house to make way for private development:

Here is my house that you did take
From me to you, this spell I make
Your houses, your home
Your family, your friends
May they live in misery
That never ends.

I curse you all
May you rot in hell
To each of you
I send this spell

For the rest of your lives
I wish you ill
I send this now
By the power of will

Well, I suppose if Babe Ruth can curse the Red Sox, Susette Kelo can curse the folks who took her property from her.

"The moment the idea is admitted into society that property is not as sacred as the laws of God, and that there is not a force of law and public justice to protect it, anarchy and tyranny commence. If `Thou shalt not covet' and `Thou shalt not steal' were not commandments of Heaven, they must be made inviolable precepts in every society before it can be civilized or made free."

John Adams, A Defense of the American Constitutions, 1787

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