Monday, January 21, 2008

Martin Luther King, Jr.


This morning I wondered: Who would Martin Luther King Jr. support in this 2008 presidential election? He certainly would be happy to see a person of color running for president as well as seeing a black female Secretary of State, and a black supreme court justice in this great nation of ours. It is a testament to his dedication to equality and freedom that people of all genders, colors, religions and ethnicities participate in our government and in our society today.

But would Dr. King vote for someone who advocates for programs which make people dependent on government, or would he support someone who supports policies that encourage independence and self responsibility? Would he vote for someone who wants to further restrict civil liberties with national ID cards, Patriot Acts, and Unconstitutional search and seizures, and destruction of the notion of Habeus Corpus, or would he support someone who respects our precious Constitutional liberties that are supposed to be upheld? Dr. King was an American patriot who lived and died promoting Peace, Freedom and Civil Liberties. Dr. King practiced Libertarian principles of civil disobedience with non-violence. He worked to make sure that all people are treated fairly.

In his "I Have A Dream" speech, Dr. King said this:
When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
There’s considerable consonance between Dr. Ron Paul’s views and Dr. King’s, in their stands against militarism and for civil liberties. Read more here.
"Liberty is the true antidote to racism, and freedom–limited, constitutional government devoted to the protection of individual rights—can uplift us all.” - Ron Paul

Please take the time today to reflect on the words of Dr. King - rejoice in the advances he helped foster - and remember that it was the rights and freedoms that our Constitution guarantees that allowed his dream to, in many respects, become reality. That is why it is crucial for us to hold on to the ideals and intentions of our Founding documents. We must not allow ourselves to be marched into tyranny out of fear of our enemies. Dr. King knew that full well.

1 comment:

Elisheva Hannah Levin said...

Yes, it is interesting. Paul Greenberg had a column in the paper today discussing the fact that when you read the "I Have a Dream" speech, you could actually say that Dr. King was somewhat of a conservative. Or at least a classical liberal in the same sense as our founding fathers were. He is very different indeed, than his purported heirs, who embrace a different kind of racism in identity politics.